Monthly Archives: April 2012

Sliding to religious racism,

Racism is generally understood as either belief that different racial groups are characterized by intrinsic characteristics or abilities and that some such groups are therefore naturally superior to others or as practices that discriminate against members of particular racial groups,[1] for example by perpetuating unequal access to resources between groups

The definition of racism is controversial both because there is little scholarly agreement about what the word “race” means, and because there is also little agreement about what does and doesn’t constitute discrimination

a belief or doctrine that inherent differences among the various human races  determine cultural or individual achievement, usually involving the idea that one’s own race  is superior and has the right to rule others.
a policy, system of government, etc., based upon or fostering such a doctrine; discrimination.
hatred or intolerance of another race  or other races.

In politics, racism is commonly located on the far right due to the far right’s common association with nativism, racism, and xenophobia. In history, racism has been a major part of the political and ideological underpinning of genocides such as the holocaust, but also in colonial contexts such as the rubber booms in South America and the Congo, and in the European conquest of the Americas and colonization of Africa, Asia and Australia. It was also a driving force behind the transatlantic slave trade, and behind states based on racial segregation such as the USA in the 19th and early twentieth centuries and South Africa under apartheid. Practices and ideologies of racism are universally condemned by the United Nations in the Declaration of Human Rights.

 

“No human race is superior; no religious faith is inferior. All collective judgments are wrong

. Only racists make them”
Elie Wiesel

Declarations and international law against racial discrimination

In 1919, a proposal to include a racial equality provision in the Covenant of the League of Nations was supported by a majority, but not adopted in the Paris Peace Conference, 1919. In 1943, Japan and its allies declared work for the abolition of racial discrimination to be their aim at the Greater East Asia Conference. Article 1 of the 1945 UN Charter includes “promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and for fundamental freedoms for all without distinction as to race” as UN purpose.

The Structure of the Declaration

The underlying structure of the Universal Declaration was introduced in its second draft which was prepared by René Cassin. Cassin worked from a first draft prepared by John Peters Humphrey. The structure was influenced by the Code Napoleon, including a preamble and introductory general principles.[14] Cassin compared the Declaration to the portico of a Greek temple, with a foundation, steps, four columns and a pediment. Articles 1 and 2 are the foundation blocks, with their principles of dignity, liberty, equality and brotherhood. The seven paragraphs of the preamble, setting out the reasons for the Declaration, are represented by the steps. The main body of the Declaration forms the four columns. The first column (articles 3–11) constitutes rights of the individual, such as the right to life and the prohibition of slavery. The second column (articles 12–17) constitutes the rights of the individual in civil and political society. The third column (articles 18–21) is concerned with spiritual, public and political freedoms such as freedom of religion and freedom of association. The fourth column (articles 22–27) sets out social, economic and cultural rights. In Cassin’s model, the last three articles of the Declaration provide the pediment which binds the structure together. These articles are concerned with the duty of the individual to society and the prohibition of use of rights in contravention of the purposes of the United Nations

Sudan and racism

Sudan and the country name and launched by the Arabs is to collect a composite that is collected black and black is a collection of Sudan. And they were so-called limited the area east of the Red Sea and the Atlantic Ocean west of sub-Saharan this name since 3900 BC. M.

Interesting thing is that the first inhabitants of the Sudan in the stone ages (8000 BC – 3200 BC) were sex Negro, but the skulls that were found to those found to be different from any race Negro lives today, including Sudan’s population existing in all races.

Generally, in the ancient history classes were  normal even when the emergence of religions such as Christianity and Islam Slavery was an integral part of the social fabric and did not abolish slavery, but those religions that many people have been enslaved by armies fighting and war  in the name of these religions.
The great civilizations, including the Kingdom of Kush influenced and affected each other in a commercial or military relations and of the Greeks has been a clear impact in the Kingdom of Kush, the ancient Nubian and the the other way around.

When the spread of Islam came to  Sudan strongly after the armies of al-Zahir Baybars, which dramatically transformed the northern Sudan from Christianity to Islam in less than a hundred years .. Inherited some of the northern tribes of Arab culture and some Arab blood. This, of course, after years during which the Nuba slaves to pay year after year for Muslims after the agreement Bakt. It seems that they were owned slaves even before the arrival of the Muslims for their war and were not an agreement Bakt alone why they started to hunt for people to push them tribute to Muslims in Egypt.

in Sudan patronizing and racism are  practiced by black against black, another brother and his brother at home in the plight of racial discrimination in the world is his colleague in this ordeal, but why

Superiority exercised by the Sudanese Arabic-speaking language or the other languages of the people of Sudan and Superiority exercised by the Muslims of people of other languages or the non-Arab non-Muslim ethnic groups of the same.

 

“Ignorance and prejudice are the handmaidens of propaganda. Our mission, therefore, is to confront ignorance with knowledge, bigotry with tolerance, and isolation with the outstretched hand of generosity. Racism can, will, and must be defeated.”
Kofi Annan

Religion and racism

Muslims make up the vast majority of the population of Sudan and in spite of what contains Islam’s attempts for equality and justice but it is different in the case of dealing with non-Muslims.

Islamist burn the   a  Church in Jarif  West
April 21, 2012

Islamist  led by supporters of  Mohammed Abdul Karim demolished the Evangelical Church of Jarif   West by bulldozer, and set fire, in the presence of numbers of police were watching the attack, afternoon April 21 dozens of Islamist armed with sticks may have imposed a siege on the Church
And have already tried with a group attack on the church three weeks ago and failed, but invested the climate of violence and racism prevalent since last weeks and threatened  burned the church and carried out its threat to noon today in the presence of 6 vehicles filled with Police Central Reserve and several other in the plains for help and operations, who were all watching the assault without any attempt to stop them.

This escalated acts of persecution against Christians since the announcement of Omar al-Bashir in Gedaref not accept religious pluralism in Sudan after the separation, and burned since the announcement that a number of churches in Khartoum, South Kordofan, and a number of priests receiving death threats.

We stress the experience of history that can be measured in a humanitarian way in which each society treats its Minorities, and tie the hands of that minorities pay prices that later Vtgd shackles on their hands are the same. The militants and shouting (not a church anymore, not a Christian from today) Rev. Joseph Matar, describing the burning of the Jarif  church : What happened was terrible unimaginable

Description of the Rev. Joseph Matar – General Secretary of the Evangelical Presbyterian Church of Sudan – in a statement (freedoms) burn Synod Palgrave West yesterday, saying (it was something terrible can not imagine).
The complex Evangelical Church on the ground and large owned by the church a hundred years ago, and includes three halls (churches) to worship, and the Institute of the Bible – out priests who take care of Churches Presbyterian in the country – and the home for the elderly and a refuge for children and medical clinics, and boarding houses for priests learners.
Rev. Matar said that there are several points of desires in the territory of the complex, and made several attempts to achieve this purpose

Khartoum over the twenty-three years of injustice, oppression, tyranny and arrogance, corruption, murder and steal people’s money and destroy the social fabric and disrupt the politicians and leaders, the community and Establishments that time for this disses this regime  to go from the country  people and to benefit the people the State of transparency and the rule of law of the country led by the owners of Qualifications, experience and capacity to a free democratic country home too all, without racial or regional or religious or sectarian.

Times New Roman

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Beautiful people

self-affirmation is a psychological theory that was first proposed by Claude Steele (1988) with the premise that people are motivated to maintain the integrity of the self. The ultimate goal of the self is to protect an image of its self-integrity, morality and adequacy. On the whole, integrity is defined as the sense that one is a good and appropriate person and the term “appropriate” refers to behavior that is fitting or suitable given the cultural norms and the salient demands on people within their culture. This theory explains why people respond in such a way to restore self-worth when their image of self-integrity is threatened. In this theory, people would respond to the threat using the indirect psychological adaptation of affirming alternative self resources unrelated to the provoking threat. As a result, these “self-affirmations” enable people to deal with threatening events and information without resorting to defensive biases, by fulfilling the need to protect self-integrity in the face of threat. In fact, this self affirmation allows people to respond to the threatening information in a more open and even-handed manner.

Gay pride

pride is the positive stance against discrimination and violence toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people to promote their self-affirmation, increase their visibility as a social group, build community, and celebrate sexual diversity and gender variance. Pride, as opposed to shame and social stigma, is the predominant outlook that bolsters most LGBT rights movements throughout the world. What’s more, pride has lent its name to LGBT-themed organizations, institutes, foundations, book titles, periodicals and even a cable TV station and the Pride Library.

Ranging from solemn to carnivalesque, pride events are typically held during LGBT Pride Month or some other time that commemorates a turning point in a country’s LGBT history, for example Moscow Pride in May for the anniversary of Russia’s 1993 decriminalization of homosexuality. Some types of pride events include LGBT pride parades and marches, rallies, commemorations, community days, dance parties, and large festivals such as Sydney Mardi Gras, which spans several weeks.

Common symbols of pride are the rainbow or pride flag, the lowercase Greek letter lambda (λ), the pink triangle and the black triangle, these latter two reclaimed from use as badges of shame in Nazi concentration camps.

A bit of history

1543 B.C.: The residents of Sodom and Gomorrah hold a spontaneous weeklong orgy. When one enthusiastic participant runs through the streets waving his toga over his head, it is mistaken for a parade, and an annual event is born. Sadly, its history is short lived due to an act of God.

1542 B.C.-A.D. 1968: Referred to by historians as the Time of No Floats, this dark period in gay culture saw very little in the way of organized events for queer people. Occasional parties and festivals were attempted but were generally not well attended because of little inconveniences like the bubonic plague, the Inquisition and the inability of the members of the Merrye Gaye Fellowes Chorus and Chamber Orchestra to agree on an arrangement of “My Lover Is the Sweetest Fruite” for their subsequently canceled spring concert.

 

Annual Reminders

 The 1950s and 1960s in the United States was an extremely repressive legal and social period for LGBT people. In this context American homophile organizations such as the Daughters of Bilitis and the Mattachine Society coordinated some of the earliest demonstrations of the modern LGBT rights movement.

These two organizations in particular carried out pickets called “Annual Reminders” to inform and remind Americans that LGBT people did not enjoy basic civil rights protections. Annual Reminders began in 1965 and took place each July 4 at Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

Christopher Street Liberation Day

Early on the morning of Saturday, 28 June 1969, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning persons rioted following a police raid on the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar at 43 Christopher Street, New York City. This riot and further protests and rioting over the following nights were the watershed moment in modern LGBT rights movement and the impetus for organizing LGBT pride marches on a much larger public scale.

On November 2, 1969, Craig Rodwell proposed the first pride march to be held in New York City by way of a resolution at the Eastern Regional Conference of Homophile Organizations (ERCHO) meeting in Philadelphia, along with his partner, Fred Sargeant, Ellen Broidy and Linda Rhodes.

“That the Annual Reminder, in order to be more relevant, reach a greater number of people, and encompass the ideas and ideals of the larger struggle in which we are engaged-that of our fundamental human rights-be moved both in time and location.
We propose that a demonstration be held annually on the last Saturday in June in New York City to commemorate the 1969 spontaneous demonstrations on Christopher Street and this demonstration be called CHRISTOPHER STREET LIBERATION DAY. No dress or age regulations shall be made for this demonstration.
We also propose that we contact Homophile organizations throughout the country and suggest that they hold parallel demonstrations on that day. We propose a nationwide show of support.

All attendees to the ERCHO meeting in Philadelphia voted for the march except for Mattachine Society of New York, which abstained.Members of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) attended the meeting and were seated as guests of Rodwell’s group, Homophile Youth Movement in Neighborhoods (HYMN).

Meetings to organize the march began in early January at Rodwell’s apartment in 350 Bleecker Street. At first there was difficulty getting some of the major New York organizations like Gay Activists Alliance (GAA) to send representatives. Rodwell and his partner Sargeant, Broidy, Michael Brown, Marty Nixon, and Foster Gunnison of Mattachine made up the core group of the CSLD Umbrella Committee (CSLDUC). For initial funding, Gunnison served as treasurer and sought donations from the national homophile organizations and sponsors, while Sargeant solicited donations via the Oscar Wilde Memorial Bookshop customer mailing list and Nixon worked to gain financial support from GLF in his position as treasurer for that organization.

Other mainstays of the organizing committee were Judy Miller, Jack Waluska, Steve Gerrie and Brenda Howard of GLF Believing that more people would turn out for the march on a Sunday, and so as to mark the date of the start of the Stonewall uprising, the CSLDUC scheduled the date for the first march for Sunday, June 28, 1970With Dick Leitsch’s replacement as president of Mattachine NY by “Michael Kotis” in April, 1970, opposition to the march by Mattachine ended.

There was little open animosity, and some bystanders applauded when a tall, pretty girl carrying a sign “I am a Lesbian” walked by. – The New York Times coverage of Gay Liberation Day, 1970

Christopher Street Liberation Day on June 28, 1970 marked the first anniversary of the Stonewall riots with an assembly on Christopher Street and the first Gay Pride march in U.S. history, covering the 51 blocks to Central Park. The march took less than half the scheduled time due to excitement, but also due to wariness about walking through the city with gay banners and signs. Although the parade permit was delivered only two hours before the start of the march, the marchers encountered little resistance from onlookers.

The New York Times reported (on the front page) that the marchers took up the entire street for about 15 city blocks. Reporting by The Village Voice was positive, describing “the out-front resistance that grew out of the police raid on the Stonewall Inn one year ago”.

Spread

On the same weekend gay activist groups on the West Coast of the United States held a march in Los Angeles and a march and ‘Gay-in’ in San Francisco.

One day earlier, on Saturday, 27 June 1970, Chicago Gay Liberation organized a march[20] from Washington Square Park (“Bughouse Square”) to the Water Tower at the intersection of Michigan and Chicago avenues, which was the route originally planned, and then many of the participants extemporaneously marched on to the Civic Center (now Richard J. Daley) Plaza. The date was chosen because the Stonewall events began on the last Saturday of June and because organizers wanted to reach the maximum number of Michigan Avenue shoppers. Subsequent Chicago parades have been held on the last Sunday of June, coinciding with the date of many similar parades elsewhere.

The next year, Gay Pride marches took place in Boston, Dallas, Milwaukee, London, Paris, West Berlin, and Stockholm.By 1972 the participating cities included Atlanta, Buffalo, Detroit, Washington D.C., Miami, and Philadelphia, as well as San Francisco.

Frank Kameny soon realized the pivotal change brought by the Stonewall riots. An organizer of gay activism in the 1950s, he was used to persuasion, trying to convince heterosexuals that gay people were no different than they were. When he and other people marched in front of the White House, the State Department and Independence Hall only five years earlier, their objective was to look as if they could work for the U.S. government.

Ten people marched with Kameny then, and they alerted no press to their intentions. Although he was stunned by the upheaval by participants in the Annual Reminder in 1969, he later observed, “By the time of Stonewall, we had fifty to sixty gay groups in the country. A year later there was at least fifteen hundred. By two years later, to the extent that a count could be made, it was twenty-five hundred.”

Similar to Kameny’s regret at his own reaction to the shift in attitudes after the riots, Randy Wicker came to describe his embarrassment as “one of the greatest mistakes of his life”.The image of gays retaliating against police, after so many years of allowing such treatment to go unchallenged, “stirred an unexpected spirit among many homosexuals”. Kay Lahusen, who photographed the marches in 1965, stated, “Up to 1969, this movement was generally called the homosexual or homophile movement…. Many new activists consider the Stonewall uprising the birth of the gay liberation movement. Certainly it was the birth of gay pride on a massive scale.”

LGBT  Pride ( 1973 -1978)

gay pride events become a bit too reminiscent of the whole Sodom and Gomorrah thing. When shocking images of drag queens and leather men appear on the evening news and frighten viewers, organizers decide to capitalize the name of the event — gay pride — to make it seem like a movement and thereby gain some legitimacy.

1974-1979: Considered by many to be the shining moment in the history of gay pride, the details of this happy period are nonetheless shrouded in mystery, primarily because everyone involved was too stoned to work his or her camera properly. However, the by-products of this time, which include pierced nipples, the porn star as celebrity and a renewed sense of humor, can still be felt today.

The first Rainbow Flag was designed in 1978 by Gilbert Baker, a San Francisco artist, who created the flag in response to a local activist’s call for the need of a community symbol. (This was before the pink triangle was popularly used as a symbol of pride.) Using the five-striped “Flag of the Race” as his inspiration, Baker designed a flag with eight stripes. Baker dyed and sewed the material for the first flag himself — in the true spirit of Betsy Ross.

Annual Reminders

The 1950s and 1960s in the United States was an extremely repressive legal and social period for LGBT people. In this context American homophile organizations such as the Daughters of Bilitis and the Mattachine Society coordinated some of the earliest demonstrations of the modern LGBT rights movement. These two organizations in particular carried out pickets called “Annual Reminders” to inform and remind Americans that LGBT people did not enjoy basic civil rights protections. Annual Reminders began in 1965 and took place each July 4 at Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

Christopher Street Liberation Day

Early on the morning of Saturday, 28 June 1969, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning persons rioted following a police raid on the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar at 43 Christopher Street, New York City. This riot and further protests and rioting over the following nights were the watershed moment in modern LGBT rights movement and the impetus for organizing LGBT pride marches on a much larger public scale.

On November 2, 1969, Craig Rodwell proposed the first pride march to be held in New York City by way of a resolution at the Eastern Regional Conference of Homophile Organizations (ERCHO) meeting in Philadelphia, along with his partner, Fred Sargeant, Ellen Broidy and Linda Rhodes.

“That the Annual Reminder, in order to be more relevant, reach a greater number of people, and encompass the ideas and ideals of the larger struggle in which we are engaged-that of our fundamental human rights-be moved both in time and location.
We propose that a demonstration be held annually on the last Saturday in June in New York City to commemorate the 1969 spontaneous demonstrations on Christopher Street and this demonstration be called CHRISTOPHER STREET LIBERATION DAY. No dress or age regulations shall be made for this demonstration.
We also propose that we contact Homophile organizations throughout the country and suggest that they hold parallel demonstrations on that day. We propose a nationwide show of support

All attendees to the ERCHO meeting in Philadelphia voted for the march except for Mattachine Society of New York, which abstained.Members of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) attended the meeting and were seated as guests of Rodwell’s group, Homophile Youth Movement in Neighborhoods (HYMN).[8]

Meetings to organize the march began in early January at Rodwell’s apartment in 350 Bleecker Street.[9] At first there was difficulty getting some of the major New York organizations like Gay Activists Alliance (GAA) to send representatives. Rodwell and his partner Sargeant, Broidy, Michael Brown, Marty Nixon, and Foster Gunnison of Mattachine made up the core group of the CSLD Umbrella Committee (CSLDUC). For initial funding, Gunnison served as treasurer and sought donations from the national homophile organizations and sponsors, while Sargeant solicited donations via the Oscar Wilde Memorial Bookshop customer mailing list and Nixon worked to gain financial support from GLF in his position as treasurer for that organization.[10][11] Other mainstays of the organizing committee were Judy Miller, Jack Waluska, Steve Gerrie and Brenda Howard of GLF.[12] Believing that more people would turn out for the march on a Sunday, and so as to mark the date of the start of the Stonewall uprising, the CSLDUC scheduled the date for the first march for Sunday, June 28, 1970.[13] With Dick Leitsch’s replacement as president of Mattachine NY by “Michael Kotis” in April, 1970, opposition to the march by Mattachine ended.[14]

There was little open animosity, and some bystanders applauded when a tall, pretty girl carrying a sign “I am a Lesbian” walked by. – The New York Times coverage of Gay Liberation Day, 1970[15]

Christopher Street Liberation Day on June 28, 1970 marked the first anniversary of the Stonewall riots with an assembly on Christopher Street and the first Gay Pride march in U.S. history, covering the 51 blocks to Central Park. The march took less than half the scheduled time due to excitement, but also due to wariness about walking through the city with gay banners and signs. Although the parade permit was delivered only two hours before the start of the march, the marchers encountered little resistance from onlookers.The New York Times reported (on the front page) that the marchers took up the entire street for about 15 city blocks. Reporting by The Village Voice was positive, describing “the out-front resistance that grew out of the police raid on the Stonewall Inn one year ago”.

Spread

On the same weekend gay activist groups on the West Coast of the United States held a march in Los Angeles and a march and ‘Gay-in’ in San Francisco.[18][19]

One day earlier, on Saturday, 27 June 1970, Chicago Gay Liberation organized a march[20] from Washington Square Park (“Bughouse Square”) to the Water Tower at the intersection of Michigan and Chicago avenues, which was the route originally planned, and then many of the participants extemporaneously marched on to the Civic Center (now Richard J. Daley) Plaza.[21] The date was chosen because the Stonewall events began on the last Saturday of June and because organizers wanted to reach the maximum number of Michigan Avenue shoppers. Subsequent Chicago parades have been held on the last Sunday of June, coinciding with the date of many similar parades elsewhere.

The next year, Gay Pride marches took place in Boston, Dallas, Milwaukee, London, Paris, West Berlin, and Stockholm.[17] By 1972 the participating cities included Atlanta, Buffalo, Detroit, Washington D.C., Miami, and Philadelphia, [22]as well as San Francisco.

Frank Kameny soon realized the pivotal change brought by the Stonewall riots. An organizer of gay activism in the 1950s, he was used to persuasion, trying to convince heterosexuals that gay people were no different than they were. When he and other people marched in front of the White House, the State Department and Independence Hall only five years earlier, their objective was to look as if they could work for the U.S. government.[23] Ten people marched with Kameny then, and they alerted no press to their intentions. Although he was stunned by the upheaval by participants in the Annual Reminder in 1969, he later observed, “By the time of Stonewall, we had fifty to sixty gay groups in the country. A year later there was at least fifteen hundred. By two years later, to the extent that a count could be made, it was twenty-five hundred.”[24]

Similar to Kameny’s regret at his own reaction to the shift in attitudes after the riots, Randy Wicker came to describe his embarrassment as “one of the greatest mistakes of his life”] The image of gays retaliating against police, after so many years of allowing such treatment to go unchallenged, “stirred an unexpected spirit among many homosexuals” Kay Lahusen, who photographed the marches in 1965, stated, “Up to 1969, this movement was generally called the homosexual or homophile movement…. Many new activists consider the Stonewall uprising the birth of the gay liberation movement. Certainly it was the birth of gay pride on a massive scale.”

Never apologize for showing feeling.  When you do so, you apologize for the truth. 

~Benjamin Disraeli

The design may have been influenced by flags with multicolored stripes used by various left-wing causes and organizations in the San Francisco area in the

1960s. The Rainbow Flag originally had eight stripes (from top to bottom):

  • hot pink for sex,
  • red for life,
  • orange for healing,
  • yellow for sun,
  • green for serenity with nature,
  • turquoise for art,
  • indigo for harmony, and
  • violet for spirit.

Handmade versions of this flag were flown in the 1978 Gay Freedom Day Parade.
Steve Kramer, 24 April 1998 Use of the rainbow flag by the gay community began in 1978 when it first appeared in the San Francisco Gay and Lesbian Freedom Day Parade. Borrowing symbolism from the hippie movement and black civil rights groups, San Francisco artist Gilbert Baker designed the rainbow flag in response to a need for a symbol that could be used year after year. Baker and thirty volunteers hand-stitched and hand-dyed two huge prototype flags for the parade. The flags had eight stripes, each color representing a component of the community.

It is not easy to find happiness in ourselves, and it is not possible to find it elsewhere. 

~Agnes Repplier

The revaluation

Africa

South Africa

South Africa is home to the only gay pride marches on the African continent. Joburg Pride is held in Johannesburg usually the 1st Saturday in October annually. The inaugural Joburg Pride parade was held in 1990 with fewer than one thousand participants and it has grown considerably throughout the years, with over 20,000 participants in 2009. There is also a gay pride march annually (usually in February) in Cape Town. Soweto Pride takes place in Meadowlands, Soweto every year one week before Joburg Pride, and East Rand Pride a week before that in KwaThema, Gauteng, a township on Johannesburg’s East Rand. Soweto Pride began in 2008 and East Rand Pride in 2009.

in 2011 the NELSON MANDELA BAY PRIDE 2011 it was on the Saturday 24th September.

Israel

There are Pride events in both Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. The Jerusalem parades are met with resistance due to the high presence of religious bodies in the city. Three Pride parades took place in Tel Aviv on the week of 11 June 2010. The main parade, which is also partly funded by the city’s municipality, was one of the largest ever to take place in Israel, with approximately 100,000 participants. The first Pride parade in Tel Aviv took place in 1993.

On 30 June 2005, the fourth annual Pride march of Jerusalem took place. It had originally been prohibited by a municipal ban which was cancelled by the court. Many of the religious leaders of Jerusalem’s Muslim, Jewish and Christian communities had arrived to a rare consensus asking the municipal government to cancel the permit of the paraders.

During the parade, a Haredi Jewish man attacked three people with a kitchen knife.

Another parade, this time billed as an international event, was scheduled to take place in the summer of 2005, but was postponed to 2006 due to the stress on police forces during in the summer of Israel’s unilateral disengagement plan. In 2006, it was again postponed due to the Israel-Hezbollah war. It was scheduled to take place in Jerusalem on 10 November 2006, and caused a wave of protests by Haredi Jews around central Israel.

The Israel National Police had filed a petition to cancel the parade due to foreseen strong opposition. Later, an agreement was reached to convert the parade into an assembly inside the Hebrew University stadium in Jerusalem. 21 June 2007, the Jerusalem Open House organization succeeded in staging a parade in central Jerusalem after police allocated thousands of personnel to secure the general area. The rally planned afterwards was cancelled due to an unrelated national fire brigade strike which prevented proper permits from being issued.

Philippines

On 26 June 1994, on the 25th Anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, Progressive Organization of Gays in the Philippines (ProGay Philippines) and Metropolitan Community Church (MCC) Manila organized the First LGBT Pride March in Asia, marching from EDSA to Quezon Avenue (Quezon City, Metro Manila, Philippines) and highlighting broad social issues. At Quezon City Memorial Circle, a program was held with a Queer Pride Mass and solidarity remarks from various organizations and individuals.

In 1995 MCC, ProGay Philippines and other organizations held internal celebrations. In 1996, 1997 and 1998 large and significant marches were organized and produced by Reachout AIDS Foundation, all of which were held in Malate, Manila, Philippines. In 1998, the year of the centennial commemoration of the Republic of the Philippines, a Gay and Lesbian Pride March was incorporated in the mammoth “citizens’ parade” which was part of the official centennial celebration. That parade culminated in “marching by” the President of the Philippines, His Excellency Joseph Estrada, at the Quirino Grandstand in Luneta Park in Manila.

In 1999, Task Force Pride Philippines (TFP), a network of LGBT and LGBT-friendly groups and individuals seeking to promote positive visibility for the LGBT community was born. Since then TFP has been organizing the annual Metro Manila Pride March. In 2003, decided to move the Pride March from June to the December Human Rights Week to coincide with related human rights activities such as World AIDS Day (December 1), Philippine National Lesbian Day (December 8), and International Human Rights Day (December 10).

On 10 December 2005, the First LGBT Freedom March, with the theme “CPR: Celebrating Pride and Rights” was held along the streets of España and Quiapo in Manila, Philippines. Concerned that the prevailing economic and political crisis in the country at the time presented threats to freedoms and liberties of all Filipinos, including sexual and gender minorities, LGBT individuals and groups, non-government organizations and members of various communities and sectors organized the LGBT Freedom March calling for systemic and structural change. At historic Plaza Miranda, in front of Quiapo Church, despite the pouring rain, a program with performances and speeches depicting LGBT pride was held soon after the march.

Taiwan

On 1 November 2003 the first LGBT pride parade in Taiwan, Taiwan Pride, was held in Taipei with over 1,000 people attending, and the mayor of Taipei, later president, Ma Ying-jeou. Homosexuality remains taboo in Taiwan, and many participants wore masks to hide their identities. The most recent parade, held in September 2008, attracted between approximately 18,000 participants, making it one of the largest gay pride events in Asia, second only to Tel Aviv gay parade.

After 2008, the number grows rapidly. In 2009 25,000 people participated in the gay parade under the topic “Love out loud”. And in 2010, despite bad weather conditions, the Taiwan gay parade “Out and Vote” attracted more than 30,000 people, making it the largest such event in Asia.

Europe

The very first Eastern European Pride, called The Internationale Pride, was assumed to be a promotion of the human right to freedom of assembly in Croatia and other Eastern European states, where such rights of the LGBT population are not respected, and a support for organising the very first Prides in that communities. Out of all ex-Yugoslav states, at that time only Slovenia and Croatia had a tradition of organising Pride events, whereas the attempt to organize such an event in Belgrade, Serbia in 2001, ended in a bloody showdown between the police and the counter-protesters, with the participants heavily beaten up. This manifestation was held in Zagreb, Croatia from 22–25 JunSoutheastern European countries where the sociopolitical climate is not ripe for the organization of Prides, or where such a manifestation is expressly forbidden by the authorities.

From 13 countries that participated, only Poland, Slovenia, Croatia, Romania and Latvia have been organizing Prides. Slovakia also hosted the pride, but encountered many problems with Slovak extremists from Slovenska pospolitost.

(the pride did not cross the centre of the city). Bosnia and Herzegovina, Republic of Macedonia, Albania and Lithuania have never had Prides before. There were also representatives from Kosovo, that participated apart from Serbia. It was the very first Pride organized jointly with other states and nations, which only ten years ago have been at war with each other. Weak cultural, political and social cooperation exists among these states, with an obvious lack of public encouragement for solidarity, which organizers hoped to initiate through that regional Pride event. The host and the initiator of The Internationale LGBT Pride was Zagreb Pride, which has been held since 2002.

Bulgaria

Like the other countries from the Balkans, Bulgaria’s population is very conservative when it comes to issues like sexuality. Although homosexuality was decriminalized back in 1968 people with different sexual orientations and identities are still not well accepted in society. In 2003 the country enacted several laws protecting the LGBT community and individuals from discrimination. In 2008, Bulgaria organized its first ever pride parade. The almost 200 people who had gathered were attacked by skinheads, but police managed to prevent any injuries. The 2009 pride parade, with the motto “Rainbow Friendship” attracted more than 300 participants from Bulgaria and tourists from Greece and Great Britain. There were no disruptions and the parade continued as planned. A third Pride parade took place successfully in 2010, with close to 800 participants and an outdoor concert event.

France

Paris hosts annual Gay Pride Parades on June 27, with attendances of over half a million Sixteen other parades take place at cities throughout France in: Angers, Biarritz, Bayonne,Bordeaux, Caen, Le Mans, Lille, Lyon, Marseille, Montpellier, Nancy, Nantes, Paris, Rennes, Rouen, Strassbourg, Toulouse and Tours.

Greece

In Greece, endeavours were made during the 1980s and 1990s to organise such an event, but it was not until 2005 that Athens Pride established itself. The Athens Pride is held every June in the center of Athens city.

Latvia

On 22 July 2005, the first Latvian gay pride march took place in Riga, surrounded by protesters. It had previously been banned by the city council, and the Prime Minister of Latvia, Aigars Kalvītis, opposed the event, stating Riga should “not promote things like that”, however a court decision allowed the march to go ahead in 2006, LGBT people in Latvia attempted a Parade but were assaulted by “No Pride” protesters, an incident sparking a storm of international media pressure and protests from the European Parliament at the failure of the Latvian authorities to adequately protect the Parade so that it could proceed.

In 2007, following international pressure, a Pride Parade was held once again in Riga with 4,500 people parading around Vermanes Park, protected physically from “No Pride” protesters by 1,500 Latvian police, ringing the inside and the outside of the iron railings of the park. Two fire crackers were exploded with one being thrown from outside at the end of the festival as participants were moving off to the buses. This caused some alarm but no injury but participants did have to run the gauntlet of “No Pride” abuse as they ran to the buses. They were driven to a railway station on the outskirts of Riga, from where they went to a post Pride “relax” at the seaside resort of Jurmala. Participants included MEPs, Amnesty International observers and random individuals who travelled from abroad to support LGBT Latvians and their friends and families. In 2008, Riga Pride was held in the historically potent 11 November Krestmalu (Square) beneath the presidential castle. The participants heard speeches from MEPs and a message of support from the Latvian President. The square was not open and was isolated from the public with some participants having trouble getting past police cordons. About 300 No Pride protesters gathered on the bridges behind barricades erected by the police who kept Pride participants and the “No Pride” protesters separated. Participants were once more “bused” out but this time a 5 minute journey to central Riga.

Lithuania

In 2010 first pride parade was held in Vilnius. About 300 foreign guests marched through the streets along the local participants. Law was enforced with nearly a thousand policemen.

The Netherlands

The Amsterdam, in the Netherlands, Gay Pride has been held since 1996 and can be seen as one of the most successful in acquiring social acceptance. The weekend-long event involves concerts, sports tournaments, street parties and most importantly the Canal Pride, a parade on boats on the canals of Amsterdam. In 2008 three government ministers joined on their own boat, representing the whole cabinet. Mayor of Amsterdam Job Cohen also joined. About 500,000 visitors were reported. 2008 was also the first year large Dutch international corporations ING Group and TNT NV sponsored the event.

Poland

In 2005, a gay pride observance in Warsaw was forbidden by local authorities (including then-Mayor Lech Kaczyński) but occurred nevertheless. The ban was later declared a violation of the European Convention on Human Rights (Bączkowski and Others v. Poland). In 2008, more than 1,800 people joined the march. In 2010 EuroPride took place in Warsaw with approximately 8,000 participants.

Portugal

In Oporto, Portuguese LGBT community performs Porto Pride in every July since 2001. Also in Oporto, a march named Marcha do Orgulho do Porto, is held, since 2006.

Lisbon, the capital of the country, performs a march Marcha do Orgulho and, since 1997, the oldest big LGBT event, the Arrail Pride.

Russia

Prides in Russia are generally banned by city authorities in St. Petersburg and Moscow, due to opposition from politicians, religious leaders and right-wing organisations. Moscow Mayor Yuri Luzhkov has described the proposed Moscow Pride as the “work of Satan”. Attempted parades have led to clashes between protesters and counter-protesters, with the police acting to keep the two apart and disperse participants. In 2007 British activist Peter Tatchell was physically assaulted.

This was not the case in the high profile attempted march in May 2009, during the Eurovision Song Contest. In this instance the police played an active role in arresting pride marchers. The European Court of Human Rights has ruled that Russia has until January 20, 2010 to respond to cases of pride parades being banned in 2006, 2007 and 2008.[32]

Serbia

On 30 June 2001, several Serbian LGBTQ groups attempted to hold the country’s first Pride march, in Belgrade. When the participants started to gather in one of the city’s principal squares, a huge crowd of opponents attacked the event, injuring several participants and stopping the march. The police were not equipped to suppress riots or protect the Pride marchers. Some of the victims of the attack took refuge in a student cultural centre, where a discussion was to follow the Pride march. Opponents surrounded the building and stopped the forum from happening. There were further clashes between police and opponents of the Pride march, and several police officers were injured.

Non-governmental organizations and a number of public personalities criticised the assailants, the government and security officials. Government officials did not particularly comment on the event, nor were there any consequences for the approximately 30 young men arrested in the riots.

On 21 July 2009, a group of human rights activists announced their plans to organize second Belgrade Pride on 20 September 2009. However, due to the heavy public threats of violence made by extreme right organisations, Ministry of Internal Affairs in the morning of September 19 moved the location of the march from the city centre to a space near the Palace of Serbia therefore effectively banning the original 2009 Belgrade Pride.[35]

Belgrade Pride parade was held on October 10, 2010 with about 1000 participants[36] and while the parade itself went smoothly, police clashed with six thousand anti-gay protesters at Serbia’s second ever Gay Pride march, with nearly 147 policemen and around 20 civilians reported wounded in the violence.[37]

Spain

Madrid Pride Parade, known as “Orgullo Gay”, is held the first Saturday after June 28 since 1979. The event is organised by COGAM (Madrid GLTB Collective) and FELGTB (Spanish Federation of Lesbians, Gays, Transsexuals and Bisexuals) and supported by other national and international LGTB groups. The first Gay Parade in Madrid was held after the death of Franco, with the arrival of democracy, in 1979. Since then, dozens of companies like Microsoft, Google and Schweppes and several political parties and trade unions, including Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party, United Left, Union, Progress and Democracy, CCOO and UGT have been supporting the parade. Madrid Pride Parade is actually the biggest gay demonstration in Europe, with more than 1.5 million attendees in 2009 according to the Spanish government.

In 2007, Europride, the European Pride Parade, took place in Madrid. About 2.5 million people attended more than 300 events over a week in the Spanish capital to celebrate Spain as the country with the most developed LGBT rights in the world. Independent media estimated that more than 200,000 visitors came from foreign countries to join in the festivities. Madrid gay district Chueca, the biggest gay district in Europe, was the centre of the celebrations. The event was supported by the city, regional and national government and private sector which also ensured that the event was financially successful. Barcelona, Valencia and Seville hold also local Pride Parades. In 2008 Barcelona hosted the Eurogames.

Turkey

Like the other countries from the Balkans, Turkey’s population is very conservative, too, when it comes to issues like sexuality. Homosexuality was decriminalized in 1858, in Ottoman era, although gays are still not well-accepted and they may face discrimination in society. Turkey is the first Muslim majority country in which gay pride march is held.

In Istanbul (since 2003) and in Ankara (since 2008) gay marches are being held each year with a small but increasing participation. Gay pride march in Istanbul started with 30 people in 2003 and in 2010 the participation became 5,000. The Istanbul pride of 2011 is considered as the biggest of Turkey and Eastern Europe until now, with more than 10.000 participants. Politicians of the biggest opposition parties, CHP and BDP also lent their support to the demonstration.

The pride march in Istanbul does not receive any support of the municipality or the government.

Australia

The Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras is the largest Australian pride event and one of the largest in the world.[45] The celebrations emerged during the early 1980s after arrests were made during pro-gay rights protests that began in 1978. The parade is held at night with nearly 10,000 participants on and around elaborate floats representing topical themes as well as political messages.

About a year ago I was a guest on a network news show in New York.  They were showing film clips from a gay pride parade down Fifth Avenue, but they only decided to show the part with men in dresses and heels.  I had seen the parade, and there were men in business suits as well.  After showing the film, the newsperson made some comments, and I found the comments extremely offensive.  “This is what’s wrong with the media,” I said.  “You show a fringe position.  You show one point of view.  You’re closing the minds of the people by not showing them what the reality is.”  I got up and walked out, and I’ve never been asked back again. 

~Kathleen Nolan

what i really like to see is an event like this in the region some were we cane start we got a long way ahead of us and a lot to learn  i may did not  mention some of the festivals and celebrations or parades took place in the world but  message is clear the time has come

GOD’S PICTURE/ EL RETRATO DE DIOS/ IL RITRATTO DI DIO [KEN ROBINSON]

by Raffaello 

A few years ago, I heard a wonderful story, which I’m very fond of telling.  An elementary school teacher was giving a drawing class to a group of six-year-old children.  At the back of the classroom sat a little girl who normally didn’t pay much attention in school.  In the drawing class, she did.  For more than twenty minutes, the girl sat with her arms curled around her paper, totally absorbed in was she was doing.  The teacher found this fascinating.  Eventually, she asked the girl what she was drawing.  Without looking up, the girl said, “I’m drawing a picture of God.”  Surprised, the teacher said, “But nobody knows what God looks like.”  The girl said, “They will in a minute.”
———————-
Hace algunos años, me contaron una historia magnífica y que siempre me gusta volver a contar. Una maestra de escuela primaria estaba, en la hora de dibujo, con un grupo de niños de seis años. En el fondo del aula, se sentaba una niña que, con mucha frecuencia, se distraía; en la hora de dibujo, en cambio, prestaba mucha atención. Durante más de veinte minutos, la niña había estado dibujando sobre el papel, completamente absorbida en lo que hacía. A la maestra, la situación se le hacía fascinante. Al final, le preguntó qué dibujaba. Sin siquiera mirarla, la niña dijo: – “Estoy haciendo el retrato de Dios”. Sorprendida, la maestra comentó: – “Pero nadie sabe cómo es Dios”. La niña replicó: – “Lo van a saber en cinco minutos”.
————————-
Parecchi anni fa, mi fu riferito un racconto bellísimo che non mi stanco mai di raccontare. Una maestra elementare insegnava a disegnare a un gruppo di ragazzini di sei anni. Nel fondo dell’aula, c’era una ragazzina che pure se a scuola era sempre distratta, però era molto interessata alla lezione di disegno. Per ben oltre venti minuti, la bimba, che era quasi arrotolata atorno al pezzo di carta su cui disegnava, era absolutamente intenta all’opera. La maestra era molto incuriosita dal fatto. Alla fine, domandò alla ragazzina cosa disegnava. Senza nemmeno alzare la testa, la bimba disse: – “Sto facendo il ritratto di Dio”.  Sorpresa, la maestra affermò: -“Ma nessuno sa com’ è Dio”. La bimba rispose: – “Lo verrano a sapere tra cinque minuti”.


[extracted from Ken Robinson (with Lou Aronica). The Element. How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything. New York: Penguin, 2009.]

the strategic battalion the cyber warfare

Every morning rises in this country you find that this government wont give up the power with out a fight

Mandour Mahdi, leader of the ruling National Congress Party in Sudan, his attack  the anti-youth groups he called them the youth of the Facebook and what was attributed to  the Mahdi Mandour along with  Nafie Ali Nafie,  we say to young people (Facebook youth) these writings that are written on the pages of the Internet, it can not change a thing or move our positions one as much as  ant or an inch.. And also: who stands before us  we will crush  and finish tll the last one in this land.

A question is   appears from the debates in chat rooms and social networking sites because or so called leaders do not know the capacity of those sites to unify the vision and the development of revolution to follow all  on the same path with the same language and vocabulary, from the reduction of what is happening and the end of the challenge to enter (the masses) … And Khartoum, the capital.

It means that the political struggle through peaceful means generally accepted according to the Constitution and the law do not apply within the literature of the ruling party and its direction at the highest levels . This explains the insistence on the sustainability of the violence in the arena of student activity in universities, and in the suppression of peaceful protests and expressions. As if they wanted to tell their opponents that they are ready to step up things and detonated in the same manner practiced by Colonel Muammar Gaddafi the Libyan  which is the most prominent title (on me  and on my enemies). This idea is old and deeply rooted in the mind of the regime that threaten intensified whenever the winds of change appear.

call that mind free which jealously guards its intellectual rights and powers, which calls no man master, which does not content itself with a passive or hereditary faith, which opens itself to light whencesoever it may come, which receives new truth as an angel from Heaven.

William Ellery Channing

2011 protests in Sudanese

They never fail who dieIn a great cause: the block may soak their gore: Their heads may sodden in the sun; their limbsBe strung to city gates and castle walls—But still their Spirit walks abroad. Though yearsElapse, and others share as dark a doom,They but augment the deep and sweeping thoughtsWhich overpower all others, and conductThe world at last to Freedom.

LORD BYRON, Marino Faliero

   Political reasons

The secession of southern Sudan and the Darfur conflict: he wanted demonstrators “to show their anger about the things that led to the division of the country, and because the future of the North is not clear” after the secession of the south. there have been calls over the Internet to organize peaceful marches against the government in all parts of Sudan in conjunction with the announcement of the results initial self-determination referendum, which refers to the desire of about 99% of southerners to secede from the north. He also criticized the activists secession of southern Sudan, which Nspoh “the policy of divide and rule adopted by the government,” and the conflict in Darfur continued for eight years (to date 2011).

  • No freedom: also called on those sites (in the inspiration of the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions) to demonstrate in protest against what they described as narrowing freedoms.
  • Violation of human rights: activists also condemned what his human rights violations committed by security forces.
  • Arrest of Hassan al-Turabi: Sudanese opposition forces threatened to shoot down the government of President Omar al-Bashir through the mobilization of their audiences and to get off the street, and that after the arrest of Sudanese security service leader of the opposition Popular Congress Hassan al-Turabi. The Sudanese security apparatus arrested Turabi from his home late Monday, 17/1/2011 CE, said Nafie Ali Nafie, Assistant to the President of Sudan, that the security agencies received information described Bmothagh prove the involvement of al-Turabi of seeking to create what he called strife and assassinations in the street.
  • Calls to change the system: calls appeared on the Facebook site to demonstrate peacefully to demand the government to drop and even change the system.


2 – economic and social causes

  • High cost of living, poverty and unemployment: young activists denounced the online inflation and rising food prices, poverty and unemployment. According to government figures released by the end of 2010, the unemployment rate reached 40% in Sudan.
  • Experts considered that half the population of northern Sudan about living under the poverty line.
  •  Corruption The activists also denounced the site via Facebook what they described as corruption.


3 – the wave of the outbreak of Arab protests

Broke out in early 2011, a wave of mass protests, including many Arab countries, igniting spark of the Tunisian citizen Mohammed Bouazizi, who burned himself to protest the poor conditions in Tunisia. The young people are leading these protests across the Arab, especially social networking sites on the Internet Calfaspock and Twitter, to demand political reforms, economic and social. And has achieved remarkable successes such protest Krh Tunisian and Egyptian revolution, which toppled two Presidents Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, Hosni Mubarak.

The timeline of the events

Appeared invitations to students via social networking sites on the Internet such as Facebook to organize peaceful marches against the government in all parts of Sudan on Sunday, 30.1.2011 m five days after the start of the revolution of January 25 Egyptian in 2011, which demanded the fall of the regime of President Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.

also called some of them to pretend to change the system. The demonstrations in conjunction also with the announcement of preliminary results of self-determination referendum for South Sudan, which refers to the desire of about 99% of southerners to secede from the north.

Tuesday, 25/1/2011

Sudanese president affirms that he would not flee paid tribute to Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir uprising of the Tunisian people, which led to the deposition of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali and his flight from the country, stressing that it will not escape that erupted Sudanese against him, as he stressed that he would not are reluctant on the application of Islamic law in the north after separation of the south.

Sunday, 30/1/2011 m (the first protest)

Student protest: police clashed today with Sudanese university students as they tried to get out in rallies to denounce the rise in prices and demand the resignation of the government and the beat and detained some of them. According to Agence France-Presse that the riot police responded to about 1000 students from Omdurman Islamic University, during a march to the exit in the street shouting slogans criticizing President Omar Hassan al-Bashir. It said the clashes broke out when protesters began throwing stones at police, who in turn took the beating students with sticks. And Reuters reported that dozens of police officers started beating students with sticks in Jackson Square and some of them arrested. Demonstrated as well as about 500 students from the university in Omdurman civil chanting slogans critical of the high prices and demanding change. The riot police fired rounds of tear gas and surrounded the students at both universities.

Front of the palace: 100 young people marched towards the presidential palace near the center of Khartoum chanting “We want change, not the high prices.” And addressed the crowd as well as those of the police who chased the protesters and arrested at least 5 of them.

Arrest of journalists: As police arrested about a dozen journalists working for local media and international and asked them not to cover the protests.

Timing of the protests: These demonstrations in response to calls over the Internet to organize peaceful marches against the government in all parts of Sudan in conjunction with the announcement of preliminary results of the referendum on self-determination, which refers to the desire of about 99% of southerners to secede from the north. Come as well as five days after the start of the outbreak of the revolution, January 25, which demanded the fall of the Egyptian regime of President Hosni Mubarak.

Police Warning: The Sudanese police yesterday warned of the consequences of demonstrating to the overall change, and drop the system in ways that are illegal in the face while the ruling National Congress Party accused the Popular Congress Party and the movements of the left being behind the call to demonstrate that spread across the Internet.

 Friday, 11/2/2011

dozens of women, families of political prisoners and activists in Khartoum in front of the Intelligence and Security Services of Sudan and demanded the release of their relatives or to bring them to trial. Also called burqa to allow their families to know their families and place of detention to visit them to check on their health.

 Sunday, 13/2/2011

A gathering of journalists: the Sudanese security forces prevented journalists from the day organizing a protest against the arrest of their colleagues during demonstrations two weeks ago.

It also gave a Sudanese security arrested five television cameramen and journalists trying to cover the protests. The spread of dozens of security men and officers in civilian clothes in the vicinity of the National Press Council – the body overseeing the media sector – in order to prevent the gathering of media.

A feminist rally: on the other attended a feminist rally (about 20 women) in front of the Sudanese security apparatus in which demonstrators demanded the release of their children detained by the security during the protest demonstrations the country has experienced. Where gathered quietly in front of the security in Khartoum without causing friction with the police and their children lift their pictures of the detainees.

Monday 21/2/2011

Said spring of Abd al-Ati senior official in the ruling National Congress Party in Sudan today that Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir would not seek to run again in presidential elections. [9] According to the Constitution of Sudan’s current, the upcoming presidential elections scheduled to take place within four years.

He also said that the president has pledged to form a committee to fight corruption, and that he hinted he may retire, a move critics say it is designed to calm the opposition at a time when unrest sweeping the Arab world.

 Tuesday, 8/3/2011

Authorities arrested more than fifty minutes after the woman Bdihen protest in the capital of Omdurman against human rights violations and to celebrate International Women’s Day, has announced that submitting to trial within the next few hours.

Sunday, 20/3/2011

Young Sudanese demonstrated: young men called on Sudanese to protest tomorrow against the regime of President Omar al-Bashir in Sudan in various parts of inspiration on what appears to be demonstrations in the Arab world.

The police violently suppressed a number of demonstrations since the beginning of the year, using tear gas and barn to disperse the demonstrators and arrested many of them.

Bashir was announced last month the establishment of a committee to fight corruption, and said he would not run for another term, according to the announcement made by the ruling party leadership. But advocates see a demonstration Monday that the National Congress Party has lost its credibility completely, leaving only the demonstrations for change despite the risks involved in it. Analysts were unanimous to say that the shortage of basic foodstuffs and services may be a critical element in the mobilization of the Sudanese.

Monday 21/3/2011 ( protest II)

Sudanese police intervened using the barn and lacrimal gas to disperse two protests two small anti-government, when young men began a second attempt to simulate the uprisings Tunisia and Egypt.

Khartoum: Hundreds of demonstrators chanted slogans of “freedom .. freedom,” and raised the slogan “the people wanted to overthrow the regime.” And heavily armed police surrounded the university and spread throughout the capital, Khartoum. Bahera then hit the demonstrators, and used tear gas near the bus station head in Khartoum.

And dumdum: About 250 demonstrators gathered in the market and chanting slogans such as “people want to overthrow the regime”, “not the high prices.” Before being dispersed by police and arrested a number of militants.

The scores of those arrested since the first protest against the government on 30 January 2011 AD they had been tortured and beaten. They were released without charge.

Wednesday, 23/3/2011

Threatened the ruling National Congress Party, the political forces crushed the opposition and “wiped off the face of the earth” if they tried to stage a demonstration to overthrow the regime of President Omar Hassan al-Bashir.

He scoffed at Mandour Mahdi, leader of the party of youth “facebook” who claim to change the system, describing them as tails, saying that what the communists postings on the Internet pages will not shake Remca in the eyes of the system.

The youth organized a Facebook protest of some small, most recently two protests anti-government in Khartoum on Monday, but police dispersed firing tear gas at demonstrators. In the city of Wad Medani in central Sudan, about 250 protesters gathered in the market before being dispersed by police and arrested a number of militants.


Wednesday, 6/4/2011

Called for thousands of young Sudanese in a campaign on Facebook and other social sites on the Internet, of Sudanese descent to the street and drop to change the regime of President Omar Hassan al-Bashir on the lines of what happened in Tunisia and Egypt, but the government alluded to deter this campaign. While not clear the nature of this campaign, youth not to be taken by the form of demonstrations, local information indicates that the young are independent and others belonging to a number of political parties are moving the call to demonstrate against the government following the example of experiences of Tunisia and Egypt.

And select the Sudanese youth in the campaign on Facebook and other sites a set of demands, including freedom and the fight against corruption, unemployment, hunger, oppression and poverty, as they claim to form a transitional government followed by national elections free and fair. They called to stand as a row – along with our children displaced poor people who stole their livelihood – to prevent further terror and the confiscation of the future.

It means that the handling of the political conflict by peaceful means recognized by the Constitution and the law of parties, do not fall within the literature of the ruling party and its direction at the highest levels of the organization. This explains the insistence on the sustainability of violence in the arena of student activity in universities, and in the suppression of peaceful protests and expressions. As if they wanted to tell their opponents that they are ready to step up things and detonated in the same manner practiced by Colonel Muammar Gaddafi of the Libyan people, which is the most prominent title (on and on my enemies). This idea is old and deeply rooted in the mind of the system (rescue?!) That threaten Balsomlh intensified whenever the winds of change.

That humanity and sincerity which dispose men to resist injustice and tyranny render them unfit to cope with the cunning and power of those who are opposed to them. The friends of liberty trust to the professions of others because they are themselves sincere, and endeavour to secure the public good with the least possible hurt to its enemies, who have no regard to anything but their own unprincipled ends, and stick at nothing to accomplish them.

WILLIAM HAZLITT, Characters of Shakespeare’s Plays

so what else cane we say or do

Article (14) of the Act does not allow the Sudanese parties, nor permit any party branches the  formation of armed even if the ruling party state, which is said by politicians and media at the time they hear statements Mandour. Legal opinion about the armed formations of the political parties registered under the law does not allow the Sudanese parties and allows the formation of armed militias to any party whatsoever. Says the legal lawyer  Al-Hajj that announcement formation Battalion (virility strategy) by the National Congress party constitutes a violation under the Criminal Code of 1991 as it works to create destabilization and strife between the citizens and violates the law of parties who spoke on condition for the exercise of political action away from any military action or a religious or racist.
In the context explained the legal expert Nabil Adib that under the law of parties, the Sudanese are not allowed in any armed organization of political parties registered in accordance with its reasons, and said the battalion, under any name is a call to a breach of the Constitution and a violation of criminal law and a violation of citizens’ rights regarding the right of association and expression, assembly and peaceful demonstration.
lawyer Mohamed Ibrahim Adam, the establishment of a battalion of the National Convention for the Suppression of the people and silence the voice in the expression of freedom and change and bring down the system that had burdened the people with its policies clumsy, politically and economically is a violation of the law of parties in Sudan, and said whatever the name of the organization newborn and justification for its establishment is to organize contrary to law and the Constitution.
The lawyer said Shadia behind God to the National Congress Party did not learn a lesson from motives of revolutions in both Egypt and Tunisia, Yemen and the composition of the battalion came in response to what is happening from the revolutions in the region surrounding the Sudan, said rather than respond to the demands of the masses and take the lesson useful to those revolutions trying to Congress to do more deterrence and repression against defenseless people.

My Cyber world

There’s a land where I go when I need to share
that’s not on a map, yet exists everywhere
A land of names without faces, a curious place.

A modern creation that’s called cyberspace.
There’s all creation of people with cute little names
Like Pookie, and Sandman and Rosebud and Flames.

Some are just snobs and some are real fun.
And some of them just want to find someone.

But both good and bad they all play a role.
Still each one unique, but part of the whole.

We talk and laugh and wonder why.
We flirt and hug and sometimes cry.
We can’t be heard and can’t be seen

.
Yet, there it is, right on our screen.
But all in all the most curious part
Is the power it has to open our heart.
To share with a stranger those things we’ve concealed

Which to our closest of friends we’d never reveal.
Our deepest regrets and most troubling fears
The scars in our life which bring us to tears.

What gives them the power to reach into me
and show me the truths that I never see.

How do they manage to open my eyes
And make me confess the deceit and the lies.

I don’t understand this magical spell,
But I know that without it my life would be hell.
This must have been planned by the Creator up above,
Cause there’s no place on earth where you’ll find as much love.
When I need direction I know I can find
those angels from heaven just waiting online.

 

The sexual revolution to come

it very Strange that we still think that homosexuality is something imported from the west that the western media is responsible for our existence and  homosexuality in our society though as is well as every one known that the LGBTs all over the world are fighting for there rights up and there have reduce physical assault on them we have so many issues that is in working progress that i cant explain in one post so ill try to get as much as i cane for one mater   at a time lat start with woman’s rights, woman’s in In our religion before 1400 years ago wasn’t the Prophet Muhammad Peace be upon him  married Khadija and she was working in the field of trading business  and she had Merchandise tend to ALsham  that the area know now as  Syria, Jordan, Palestine and Israel and was successful business  woman in her business and now we are a male society  there is no Equality  the woman’s are  seen as for breeding and taking care of our children.

and like i did say in an earlier post that homosexuality in Islam was know in Velvet classes were they had  Of castration for boys to work as servants so serve there woman so what the fuss all about homosexuality, Let’s be reasonable and discuss all issues with regard to sexual practices and open all our doors and of course this well not happen and because  of the history is  stories carried by the facts indicate the presence of homosexuality in distant era

Or guardian, what us to live like we did 1400 years ago, and forget the changes and alteration and development in science and the needs and the objective conditions prevailing in this day .

here is an active effort to obstruct pubescents from starting to engage in sexual activity. This includes keeping pubescents from finding the information they need to understand their sexual issues. So-called “sex education” is practically always a work of deception which focuses on biology while concealing excitement-arousal, which is what interests them the most, and hides the fact that all their worries and difficulties originate from unsatisfied sexual impulses

With the tremendous scientific progress in the field of communications, and development in the world of information and technology, and the transfer of information, event, and news from one place to another, there is no longer some thing hidden.

The world is not divided into sheeps and goats.  Not all things are black nor all things white.  It is a fundamental of taxonomy that nature rarely deals with discrete categories.  Only the human mind invents categories and tries to force facts into separated pigeon-holes.  The living world is a continuum in each and every one of its aspects.  The sooner we learn this concerning sexual behavior the sooner we shall reach a sound understanding of the realities of sex.  ~Alfred Kinsey, Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, 1948

gay day magazine Tunisia

Gay day magazine in Green Tunisia as we like to call is the the start of the revolution 1st there was  in the political side by taking out the government regime then in the they are the lead the way in the sexual revolution that magazine was launched in March 2011 and is dedicated to the LGBT communes with different topics from the LGBTs perspective like healthy environment to tackle challenges, advocate for human rights  i fell in love with it for day one i sow it is sophisticated and modern.
Gayday Magazine est une revue apolitique gérée par des bénévoles. Consultez notre page “About Us” pour en apprendre d’avantage. Pour toutes questions et/ou contributions, merci d’utiliser la forme Contact Us.
there a lot other reaching out to our communities to the man and woman every were who in need to know all about Gender, personality, knowledge about homosexuality issues that face the them and all the challenges like the maker of  face all the challenges in Arab world and so many questions  i do not claim to have all the answers but i learn as i go, they say that the wisdom is in the trees not the glass windows and  i see people before here people that are  standing tall and in the face of this challenges so there will be a revolution.

You are digging for the answers until your fingers bleed, to satisfy the hunger, to satiate the need…. And as you pray in your darkness for wings to set you free, you are bound to your silent legacy~Melissa Etheridge, “Silent Legacy,” Yes I Am, 1993

 

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